Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Local and Community News

Santa Ana, Calif. School Board Rejects Abstinence-Only Curriculum

May 16, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The Santa Ana, Calif., School Board voted Tuesday to reject "Game Plan," an abstinence-only sex education curriculum, saying it did not meet state requirements. The 3-2 vote capped a contentious night. "It's a good plan and I believe in abstinence," board member Sal Tinajero said. "But I believe there is a need to give knowledge because knowledge is power." Tinajero was referring to shortcomings in the curriculum as outlined by district staff. If Game Plan were adopted, staff said, there would have to be supplemental materials on HIV/AIDS and STDs, among other issues.

Game Plan, developed by Project Reality, consists of an eight-chapter workbook that stresses marriage before sex. Game Plan does not discuss the use of contraceptives or provide resources for students who choose not to abstain. The plan was heavily promoted by board President Rosemarie Avila, with support by member Rob Richardson. Before the meeting, Avila said the plan offered more information on abstinence than other curriculums she had evaluated. "It's a more realistic view of what's out there," Avila said.

Beatriz Salas, a Santa Ana mother and vocal supporter of Game Plan, said she hopes to organize other parents to protest the board's decision at the next meeting. She said Santa Ana's largely Latino population is more conservative and needs a curriculum that addresses that. "We are a religious people; we don't want [our kids] exposed to sex," she said. The meeting was preceded by a rally organized by Game Plan supporters.

Opponents of Game Plan said they will ask the board to form a committee to examine the current curriculum. They said a more effective program would be abstinence-based but also include information on condom use and relationship issues. In 2001, a group of teens with Campfire USA's Speak Out program approached the board and, citing Santa Ana's high teen pregnancy rate -- more than 3,000 teen deliveries in 2000 - asked the district to alter its curriculum to include more information on contraceptive use and relationship issues.

Back to other CDC news for May 16, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Los Angeles Times
05.15.03; Denise M. Bonilla

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
Quiz: Are You at Risk for HIV?
10 Common Fears About HIV Transmission
Abstinence Programs

Tools
 

Advertisement