Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Medical News

Birth-Control Gel Also Might Kill HIV

July 6, 2005

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

According to doctors worldwide, the spermicide gel C31G could be a breakthrough in birth control and might fight diseases including HIV. The gel contains no hormones, which can cause side effects and require a prescription, is easy to use, and is packaged in an applicator similar to a tampon's.

A disease-fighting female contraceptive would have "a huge public health impact," said Heidi Milliken, manager of the Women's Health Research Unit (WHRU) at the Portland-based Oregon Health & Science University, which is helping test C31G's contraceptive power. The university is part of the Contraceptive Clinical Trials Network (CCTN), a group of 14 health centers financed by the National Institutes of Health.

Although condoms limit the spread of HIV/AIDS, women do not have control over their use. While female condoms might offer limited disease protection, no other contraceptive really fights diseases, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

Advertisement
For years, health experts thought the spermicide Nonoxynol-9 could limit STDs, but tests showed it irritated the body and made it more susceptible to diseases. C31G and Nonoxynol-9 work in similar ways, said WHRU Director Dr. Jeffrey Jensen. Early tests show C31G "highly potent" in fighting viruses and bacteria, but not as irritating as Nonoxynol-9, Jensen said. Scientists are researching C31G's disease-fighting ability in Africa with female volunteers at high risk for STDs.

Early tests suggest C31G is about 85 percent successful at preventing pregnancy, approximately the same rate as Nonoxynol-9 used alone. The CCTN testing sites are enrolling healthy women ages 18-40 in long-term sexual relationships with one partner. Two-thirds will get C31G and the rest will receive Nonoxynol-9.

Back to other news for July 6, 2005

Adapted from:
Times-Picayune (New Orleans)
06.26.05; Andy Dworkin

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More News and Research on Microbicides

Tools
 

Advertisement