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Medical News

Study Reveals Racial Disparities in Prenatal HIV Testing

October 13, 2005

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

D.N. Perlman and colleagues investigated within-group and between-group variations in prenatal HIV testing in a sample of low-income pregnant and recently postpartum women. The scientists used multivariable linear regression to estimate proportional differences in prenatal HIV testing for the total sample and stratified by race. "In bivariate analyses," the study said, "race and site of care jointly affected the probability of being tested."

The study found that predictors of prenatal testing differed by race. Hispanic women had the highest probability of being tested in public-practice settings. Relative to white women, black women had a higher probability of being tested in public and private practices. Receiving prenatal care in a community health center or hospital outpatient clinic increased the probability of testing for Hispanics, the authors reported, while being a recent victim of intimate partner violence was associated with less frequent testing for blacks. "Positive beliefs about HIV screening, while significant for blacks and Hispanics, was the only factor associated with testing for whites," the study found.

"Our data suggest that racial biases may be influencing providers' approach to testing, rather than CDC's 2001 guidelines for HIV screening of pregnant women. Study findings are being used to modify social marketing campaigns and improve provider trainings regarding prenatal HIV testing," the researchers concluded.

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The report, "Disparities in Prenatal HIV Testing: Evidence for Improving Implementation of CDC Screening Guidelines," appeared in the Journal of the National Medical Association (2005;97(7 Suppl):44S-51S).

Back to other news for October 13, 2005

Adapted from:
AIDS Weekly & Law
10.06.2005

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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Quiz: Are You at Risk for HIV?
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More on HIV Testing for Pregnant Women

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