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Fact Sheet: HIV/AIDS and People of Color

June/July 1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

People of color in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. These statistics on African-Americans, Latinos, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives will provide some insight into the significance of the problem.

Health care providers and practitioners can provide better services related to HIV/AIDS prevention by developing a greater understanding of these groups and their cultural values.


African-Americans

  • In 1997, there were an estimated 106,240 African-Americans living with AIDS compared with 45,928 in 1992.1

  • Through December 1998, 108,874 African-American males and 32,733 African-American females died of AIDS related causes.2

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  • Among the cumulative reported African-American male adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 38 percent were among men that have sex with men, 35 percent were from injecting drug use, 7 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 21 percent were from other exposure categories.3

  • Among the cumulative reported African-American female adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 44 percent were among injecting drug use, 37 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 19 percent were from other exposure categories.4

  • HIV is now the leading cause of death among African-American males and of African-American females ages 25 to 44.5

  • In 1997, 90.4 percent of African-American females and 89.1 percent of African-American males reported being taught about HIV/AIDS in school.6

  • In 1997, 75.3 percent of African-American females and 70 percent of African-American males reported talking about HIV/AIDS with parents or other adult family members.7


Latinos

  • In 1997, there were an estimated 52,537 Latinos living with AIDS compared with 23,840 in 1992.8

  • Through December 1998, 59,033 Latino males and 11,901 Latina females had died of AIDS-related causes.9

  • Among the cumulative reported Latino male adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 43 percent were among men that have sex with men, 36 percent were from injecting drug use, 5 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 16 percent were from other exposure categories.10

  • Among the cumulative reported Latina female adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 41 percent were among injecting drug use, 47 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 12 percent were from other exposure categories.11

  • HIV is the second leading cause of death among Latino males and Latina females ages 25 to 44.12

  • In 1997, 85.1 percent of Latina females and 86.6 percent of Latino males reported being taught about HIV/AIDS in school.13

  • In 1997, 64.7 percent of Latina females and 57 percent of Latino males reported talking about HIV/AIDS with parents or other adult family members.14


Asian/Pacific Islanders

  • In 1997, there were an estimated 2,100 Asian/Pacific Islanders living with AIDS compared with 1,010 in 1992.15

  • Through December 1998, 2,504 Asian/Pacific Islander males and 286 Asian/Pacific Islander females had died of AIDS-related causes.16

  • Among the cumulative reported Asian/Pacific Islander male adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 74 percent were among men that have sex with men, 5 percent were from injecting drug use, 3 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 17 percent were from other exposure categories.17

  • Among the cumulative reported Asian/Pacific Islander female adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 17 percent were among injecting drug use, 47 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 35 percent were from other exposure categories.18


American Indians/Alaskan Natives

  • In 1997, there were an estimated 886 American Indians/Alaskan Natives living with AIDS compared with 461 in 1992.19

  • Through December 1998, 877 American Indian/Alaskan Native males and 158 American Indians/Alaskan Native females had died of AIDS-related causes.20

  • Among the cumulative reported American Indian/Alaskan Native male adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 57 percent were among men that have sex with men, 16 percent were from injecting drug use, 2 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 24 percent were from other exposure categories.21

  • Among the cumulative reported American Indian/Alaskan Native female adult/adolescent AIDS cases through December 1998, 47 percent were among injecting drug use, 36 percent were from heterosexual contact, and 17 percent were from other exposure categories.22


References

  1. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, Year-end Edition, 10, no. 2 (Atlanta, Georgia: CDC), p. 37.

  2. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 30.

  3. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 18.

  4. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 20.

  5. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Deaths: Final Data 1996," National Vital Statistics Report, 47 no. 9 (November 10, 1998) pp. 34, 36.

  6. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance," Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 47, no. SS-3 (August 14, 1998), p. 76.

  7. Ibid.

  8. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, Year-end Edition, 10, no. 2 (Atlanta, Georgia: CDC), p. 37.

  9. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 30.

  10. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 18.

  11. U.S. Centers for Disease Control. p. 20.

  12. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Deaths: Final Data 1996," National Vital Statistics Report, 47 no. 9 (November 10, 1998) pp. 38, 40.

  13. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance," Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 47, no. SS-3 (August 14, 1998), p. 76.

  14. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 76.

  15. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, Year-end Edition, 10, no. 2 (Atlanta, Georgia: CDC), p. 37.

  16. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 30.

  17. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 18.

  18. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 20.

  19. U.S. Centers for Disease Control. p. 37.

  20. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 30.

  21. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 18.

  22. U.S. Centers for Disease Control, p. 20.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. It is a part of the publication SIECUS Report.
 
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