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Medical News

Gender Differences in the Prediction of Condom Use Among Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders: Testing the Information-Motivation-Behavior Skills (IMB) Model

April 26, 2006

The current study sought to evaluate the predictive value of the Information-Motivation-Behavior Skills (IMB) model of HIV prevention for sexually active juvenile offenders and to explore gender differences in IMB model constructs for condom use in vaginal intercourse.

From predominantly African-American adolescent detainees (328 males; 195 females; 523 total), the researchers collected self-reported measures of AIDS knowledge, pro-condom peer influence, condom attitudes, risk perception, condom use self-efficacy, vaginal intercourse frequency, and frequency of condom-protected vaginal intercourse.

Male gender, peer influence, positive condom attitudes, and condom self-efficacy significantly predicted condom use in the combined model. In analyses by gender, condom use by males was predicted by peer influence (modestly) and by positive condom attitudes. Among females, condom use was predicted by peer influence, self-efficacy, and condom attitudes. Female participants reported significantly greater knowledge, less peer influence, higher perceived infection risk, more positive attitudes toward condoms, and more self-efficacy, but less condom use.

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Despite awareness of condom efficacy, females may find it difficult to use condoms consistently. "Power imbalances or other dynamics operating in their relationships with males need further exploration," the researchers concluded. "Gender differences in the relationship between condom self-efficacy and condom use were masked in the analysis of the total sample, indicating the value of testing theories of HIV prevention separately by gender."

Back to other news for April 26, 2006

Adapted from:
Journal of Adolescent Health
01.2006; Vol. 38; No. 1: P. 18-25; Angela A. Robertson, Ph.D.; Judith A. Stein, Ph.D.; Connie Baird-Thomas, Ph.D.


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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