Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Medical News

Israel -- Pharyngeal Gonorrhea in Female Sex Workers: Response to a Single 2-g Dose of Azithromycin

August 29, 2006

Citing a sharp increase in the incidence of gonorrhea in Tel Aviv, Israel, since 1999, the authors noted that nearly one-half of interviewed patients admitted contracting the infection from a sex worker. In two-thirds of cases, oral sex (fellatio) was the most probable route of acquiring the disease. In this study, the researchers assessed the prevalence of pharyngeal gonorrhea among sex workers in Tel Aviv and evaluated the efficacy of a single 2-g dose of azithromycin in eradicating infection.

The investigators obtained throat specimens for gonococcal culture from 301 female sex workers practicing in brothels. Participants answered a questionnaire covering demographic and sexual behavior information, and they took a single 2-g dose orally under supervision. Women with positive cultures were re-examined a week later for eradication of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

The researchers isolated N gonorrhoeae from 27 women (9 percent). The median age of women with pharyngeal gonorrhea was 23 (range, 18-32 years). Eighty-five percent were born in the former Soviet Union -- mostly Russia, Moldavia and Ukraine. Eighty-eight percent of the participants reported regular condom use in vaginal sex, but only 60 percent reported always using condoms for oral sex. All isolates were susceptible to azithromycin (MIC "A high carriage rate of gonococci in the throat and a low rate of condom use in oral sex were documented among sex workers in Tel Aviv," the authors concluded. "A single 2-g dose of azithromycin was very effective in eradicating gonococci from the throat.

Back to other news for August 29, 2006

Adapted from:
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
08.22.2006; Vol. 33; No. 8: P. 512-515; Michael Dan, MD; Francesca Poch, MSc; Ziva Amitai, MD; Dana Gefen, MD; Tamy Shohat, MD


  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More HIV News

Tools
 

Advertisement