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Medical News

Sexual Risk Reduction for Persons Living With HIV: Research Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials, 1993 to 2004

June 19, 2006

The authors of the current study conducted a meta-analytic review of interventions to reduce HIV-positive persons' sexual risk.

Studies that examined a deliberate sexual risk-reduction strategy in a sample that included HIV-positive participants; used a randomized controlled trial design; measured condom use or number of sexual partners after the intervention; and provided sufficient information to calculate effect size (ES) estimates were included.

The authors gathered reports from computerized databases, by contacting individual researchers, by searching relevant journals and conference proceedings, and by reviewing reference sections of obtained papers. "Data from 15 studies (N=3,234 participants) available as of November 30, 2004 were included. ES estimates were standardized mean differences."

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"Across the studies, intervention participants exhibited lowered sexual risk relative to control participants on condom use (mean ES=0.16, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]: 0.08-0.25) but not for number of sexual partners (mean ES=-0.01, 95 percent CI: -0.16 to 0.14)," the researchers reported. "Interventions were more successful at increasing condom use if the sample included fewer men who have sex with men (MSM) or younger participants and when interventions included motivational and skills components."

Behavioral interventions that included motivational and skills components were especially effective at reducing sexual risk, the authors concluded. "Such interventions have been less effective for older samples, suggesting the need for further refinement to enhance their efficacy. Motivational- and skill-based interventions have not yet been tested with HIV-positive MSM who, in general, seem to have benefited less from extant risk-reduction interventions."

Back to other news for June 19, 2006

Adapted from:
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
04.15.06; Vol. 41; No. 5: P. 642-650; Blair T. Johnson, Ph.D.; Michael P. Carey, Ph.D.; Stephenie R. Chaudoir, B.A.; Allecia E. Reid, B.A.


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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