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Medical News

Associations Among Body Composition, Androgen Levels and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Status in Adolescents

September 13, 2006

The researchers conducted the current study to investigate whether factors influencing body composition may be unique for male and female adolescents with horizontal transmission of HIV.

At baseline, researchers conducted anthropomorphic measurements on HIV-infected and -uninfected youth, ages 13-18, participating in the multi-center project REACH (Reaching for Excellence on Adolescent Health Care). Measurements included height, weight, bicep, tricep, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold and midarm circumference. Body mass index, muscle mass, fat-free body mass, and fat mass were calculated, and predictors of those measures were assessed using multiple variable linear regression. Predictors included contraception, HIV status and related variables (CD4 counts, treatment status and viral load), substance use, androgen levels as well as appetite changes, and bone age.

In multiple variable linear regression analysis, female adolescents' body composition was associated with HIV status, CD4+ T cell counts, and free testosterone levels. The investigators found HIV status was associated with higher fat and lean body mass, but lower CD4+ T cell counts were associated with lower fat and lean body mass. Higher testosterone levels were associated with higher lean and fat mass. For adolescent males, higher total testosterone levels but not free testosterone levels were associated with lower lean and fat mass.

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"HIV status was not associated with lower muscle or fat mass," the authors concluded. "Different factors influenced body composition for females than males. Higher testosterone levels may be protective against loss in lean and fat mass in females."

Back to other news for September 13, 2006

Adapted from:
Journal of Adolescent Health
08.2006; Vol. 39; No. 2: P. 164-173; Anna-Barbara Moscicki, M.D.; Jonas H. Ellenberg, Ph.D.; Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D.; Xu Jiahong, M.P.H.


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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