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News Briefs

In Brief: United States Immigration

April 15, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

A British advocacy group, the Terrence Higgins Trust, has launched a campaign to change United States immigration policy restricting entry for those with HIV/AIDS. A 1990 law sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) stipulates that individuals with HIV/AIDS cannot immigrate to the United States. It also stipulates that short-term visitors sign a waiver releasing the United States from health coverage, and it requires that visitors have sufficient health insurance to cover any medical conditions that may arise during their visit. Because British citizens do not have to have visas for visiting the United States, many travelers from Britain may not know of the immigration regulations until their planes touch down in an American airport. At that point, visitors are presented with forms that require them to declare their HIV status. Although one can lie, the large amount of medications most HIV-positive travelers carry with them makes that option an unwise one.

The American embassy in London has responded to the Terrence Higgins campaign by saying that the waiver is necessary because of public health concerns. The embassy also pointed out that HIV-positive individuals routinely enter the United States.


Back to other CDC news for April 15, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
AIDS Policy & Law
03.29.02

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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