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California: Clinics Discussed for Young Inmates

August 14, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

San Bernardino County public health officials hope to net $55,000 to test every new arrival in juvenile hall for chlamydia, the region's most commonly reported STD among young people. About 9 percent of the male and female youths at San Benardino County Juvenile Hall screened last year tested positive for chlamydia, said Alexander Taylor, public health manager for the county.

The numbers -- 174 infections out of 2,000 youngsters -- justify opening clinics to test for and treat the disease at juvenile halls in San Benardino and Rancho Cucamonga, public health officials say. Many of the system's inmates lead sexually active lives before coming to juvenile hall and are susceptible to the disease, officials say. About 5,900 youths arrive in the system each year. The county is requesting a grant from the state Department of Health Services to pay for the clinics. The Board of Supervisors was expected to approve submitting the grant application on Tuesday.

The government began tracking chlamydia cases in 1989, and since then, the numbers have gradually increased both nationally and in the Inland area, officials say. According to the state Department of Health Services, San Bernardino County reported 299 cases per 100,000 people in 2000. In Riverside County, there were 198 per 100,000 the same year. That contrasts with a statewide report of 280 cases per 100,000 people in 2000. All three areas showed a slight increase in cases over the previous year. Eric K. Frykman, chief of preventive medical services for county public health, said the number of reported chlamydia cases may be increasing because there is now a test that can detect it in urine. He noted that previously, detection was done through more invasive tests that some people would avoid.

Back to other CDC news for August 14, 2002

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Adapted from:
Press-Enterprise (Riverside, Calif.)
08.13.02; Joanna Banks

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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