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U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) Budget for HIV/AIDS Unveiled

February 8, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released President Bush's budget plan for fiscal year 2003, which includes a total of $12.9 billion dollars to fight HIV and AIDS. This is an increase of $906 million, or 8 percent, over the current year's budget. Although under the 2003 budget plan there is an overall increase in funding, there is no increase for Ryan White Funding (for HIV/AIDS Care Services). It stays the same as last year. However, there was a 40 percent increase in the budget for ADAP (HIV prescription drug assistance for states). The specifics of the budget include:
  • Scientific research for vaccines and treatment: The HHS budget allocates $2.8 billion to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research on HIV and AIDS, which is a 10 percent increase above the current year's funding level. Included in the NIH budget is a 24 percent increase for AIDS vaccine research.

  • Prevention (stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS): The HHS budget includes $939 million for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), allocated for prevention, which is about the same amount as last year. With those resources, CDC will focus on "supporting HIV prevention programs in the United States, including efforts to reducing the number of people at high risk for acquiring or transmitting the virus; increasing HIV testing efforts; linking infected individuals with appropriate care and treatment; and strengthening the nation's ability to monitor the epidemic and respond effectively." In addition, CDC will dedicate 15 percent of the budget to promote prevention strategies and programs internationally, including expanded efforts in Africa, Latin America and Asia.

  • Care (improving efforts to care for those living with HIV/AIDS): The HHS budget will allocate $1.9 billion, the same as the current year, to fund Ryan White treatment programs, which would continue to provide care and services to an estimated 500,000 Americans living with HIV/AIDS. About $639 million of this funding would be available for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program, which provides medications to about 85,000 people.

  • Addressing HIV/AIDS among minorities: The HHS budget would allocate $410 million for efforts targeted specifically at reducing the disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on racial and ethnic minorities.

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For more information on the HHS budget: www.hhs.gov.


A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Seattle Treatment Education Project. It is a part of the publication STEP Ezine.
 
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