Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

News Briefs

HIV Captured on Film in Earliest Stages

December 30, 2002

University of Illinois-Chicago researchers have captured for the first time the very earliest stages of HIV infection in living cells. Using protein dyes from jellyfish and time-elapsed microscopy, they saw color images of individual HIV particles traveling to the nucleus of a human cell and beginning the takeover of its genetic machinery. The researchers say the virus can be seen traveling along a part of the host cell's own skeletal framework of microtubules as it makes its way from the outer membrane to the nucleus. The virus hitches a ride aboard the multi-unit protein dynein, commonly referred to as a molecular motor. "They don't make a beeline for the nucleus," said David McDonald, assistant professor of microbiology and immunology. "Their progress is somewhat halting. They appear to jump from one microtubule to another, moving in a jagged path, even sometimes moving backward. But they eventually reach their destination."

Back to other CDC news for December 30, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
United Press International
12.12.02; Ellen Beck


  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More on the Immune System

Tools
 

Advertisement