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Georgia's Bleak Birthrate: When It Comes to Teens Having Babies, State Ranks Among Worst

February 11, 2002

According to a report released by the advocacy group KidsCount, Georgia continued its long trend in ranking among the worst states in teen birth and repeat teen birth figures. Births to Georgia teens -- described as those who are under 20 years old -- reached a decade-low percentage of 14.6 in 1999, down from 16.7 percent in 1990. That is still higher than the national average of 12.3 percent. A comparatively high 18 percent of Atlanta births were to teens, and 31 percent of Atlanta's existing teen mothers gave birth again, which is a next-to-worst ranking among the nation's 50 largest cities. "Historically, rural and poverty-stricken areas have had less access to health care. Alabama, Mississippi and other [Southern] states rate higher than Georgia in numbers of teen pregnancy and infant mortality" said Marie E. Mitchell, director of the Teen Services Program at Grady Memorial Hospital. Mitchell cited as problems the deteriorating family structure and a culture that promotes rather than discourages sexual activity.


Back to other CDC news for February 11, 2002

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Adapted from:
Atlanta Journal Constitution
02.08.02; Charlotte Moore



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 

 

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