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News Briefs

British Government Plans to Test New Doctors for AIDS Virus

July 25, 2002

Britain's Department of Health confirmed Monday that it is considering requiring all new doctors and nurses to be tested for HIV. The decision follows concern over the increasing numbers of doctors and nurses joining the health service from overseas, including countries with high rates of HIV. Through this March, 2,114 nurses from South Africa, 473 from Zimbabwe and 100 from Botswana registered to work in Britain. At present, health care workers are not required to undergo HIV tests, and no cases of HIV transmission to patients have been recorded. Chief Medical Officer Liam Donaldson said a report was being discussed that had been submitted by an expert group at the request of ministers. But a General Medical Council spokesperson said there was no provision in the Medicine Act "to allow us to impose such a requirement on doctors."

Back to other CDC news for July 25, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Daily Telegraph (London)
07.23.02; Celia Hall



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 

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