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The FDA Has Just Approved Lexiva, a New Anti-HIV Medication

October 27, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, on October 20, 2003, Lexiva (Fosamprenavir calcium), manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

Lexiva is a prodrug of amprenavir, a protease inhibitor used to treat infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lexiva is rapidly converted to amprenavir by cellular or serum phosphatases in the body.

Lexiva should be taken in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of HIV infection in adults. The approval of Lexiva was based on two studies in antiretroviral naive patients and one study in protease inhibitor experienced patients.

Dr. Debra Birnkrant, director of FDA's division of antiviral products, said Lexiva offers patients a new option that allows them to reduce the number of pills they must take daily. Dosing options include taking two pills twice daily, or taking one pill twice daily with ritonavir, Birnkrant said, noting that some anti-HIV medications may require as many as eight pills twice daily. "Pill burden-wise, [Lexiva] is somewhat of an improvement, she said.

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Lexiva Tablets may be taken with or without food.

If you are on salvage therapy, talk to your doctor to see if you are a good candidate for this new medication. Note that some medications carry resistance to the same mutation; this means that if you are resistant to certain other Protease Inhibitors, you could be resistant to Lexiva. Ask your healthcare provider for more information about resistance testing.


A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Seattle Treatment Education Project. It is a part of the publication STEP Ezine.
 
See Also
More on HIV Medications
More News and Research on Fosamprenavir (Lexiva, Telzir)

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