Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Local and Community News

AIDS an Epidemic in the West Virginia Black Community, Expert Warns

March 14, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Black people make up one-quarter of people with HIV/AIDS in West Virginia, even though they make up only 3 percent of the population, according to a 2001 study by the state Bureau for Public Health. A national expert in AIDS prevention came to West Virginia Saturday to raise awareness of the AIDS epidemic in the black community. "This is a national health emergency. This is something we should focus on every day," said Dr. Beny Primm, executive director of the Addiction Research and Treatment Corporation of Brooklyn, N.Y. Primm spoke at West Virginia State College as part of a statewide teleconference on AIDS in the African-American community, sponsored by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and other groups.

Primm said African-American churches were slow in dealing with the AIDS crisis, but now are leading the way in treatment and education. "The African-American churches have made astounding progress reaching out to AIDS patients," he said, and the New York-based group Balm in Gilead is reaching out to AIDS patients in Africa, too. Primm said parents must take the lead in educating their children about the dangers of drugs and STDs. He also said that since drug use often leads to risky sexual behaviors, schools should start teaching children about drugs as early as possible.

Primm also stressed the importance of spirituality in preventing illness. Several studies show that AIDS patients with a spiritual foundation survive longer. One mother asked Primm how to talk with her 9-year-old about sexual issues, while stressing her belief in abstinence until marriage. "How do I teach him to protect himself and still be a moral person?" she asked. Primm said that parents should convey their values about sex at the same time they convey the information. "We should teach our values, and we should be realistic enough to teach them to protect themselves from risky behavior," he said.


Back to other CDC news for March 14, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Sunday Gazette Mail (Charleston, W.V.)
03.10.02; Scott Finn

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
TheBody.com's HIV/AIDS Resource Center for African Americans
HIV and Me: An African American's Guide to Living With HIV
More HIV Statistics on the African-American Community

Tools
 

Advertisement