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AZT and d4T Cross-resistance

August 8, 2000

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

STEP has reported data in past articles suggesting that a history of either Retrovir® (AZT) or Zerit® (d4T) might create cross-resistance to the other drug. This is due to the specific mutations that can cause resistance to both of these drugs. A study looking at evidence of cross-resistance between the two drugs was presented by Hernandez and colleagues at the Durban conference. In their study, blood samples from 85 people who had received Zerit®, but not Retrovir®, were analyzed. The researchers concluded that 28% of the people studied had mutations that could cause resistance to either or both of the drugs.

A second study conducted by Nicastri and colleagues examined 56 people who had taken either Zerit® and Epivir® (3TC), or Retrovir® and Epivir®, to see what type of mutations had developed. Mutations that could cause resistance for Retrovir® were found in 44% of the people studied who had taken Retrovir® and Epivir® for 18 months. Resistance for Retrovir® was found in 40% of the people who had taken Zerit® and Epivir® for 18 months. This information further supports that use of both Zerit® and Retrovir® can create mutations that cause cross-resistance. This resistance data must be viewed with some degree of caution, however, because clinically, people who have failed Retrovir® seem to respond well to Zerit®, and conversely, people who have failed Zerit® seem to respond well to Retrovir®. Studies in the next year will provide insight into the pathways of common resistance to both of the thymidine analog drugs, Zerit® and Retrovir®.


A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Seattle Treatment Education Project. It is a part of the publication STEP Ezine.
 
See Also
The Body's Guide to HIV Drug Resistance
HIV Mutations
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