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Upcoming Compassionate Use Programs for Two New Antiretrovirals Will Begin This Fall

Summer, 1999

The newest protease inhibitor on the block is ABT-378, a potent antiretroviral drug that is administered twice a day. Laboratory data suggests that ABT-378 may be effective in people with HIV that is resistant to the currently available protease inhibitors, Fortovase, Norvir, Crixivan, Viracept, and Agenerase. Early clinical trials in people who have failed only one protease inhibitor have been encouraging, but data is not yet available for the efficacy of ABT-378 in people who have failed multiple protease inhibitors.

This fall, Abbott Labs is making ABT-378 available to 200 to 300 people who have CD4 counts below 50 and do not have other treatment options. Further information can be obtained by calling Abbott's toll-free line for the ABT-378 program, 1-888-711-7193, or STEP. There is only a limited supply of the drug currently available, and early next year Abbott hopes to expand this program to offer the drug to more people who need it.

Gilead has also agreed to make its newest antiretroviral, a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor called PMPA, available through a similar compassionate use program. PMPA is the successor to adefovir, and appears to be much more potent than adefovir. Whether it will have the same significant side effect -- causing reversible damage to kidneys -- is unknown at this time. If you are interested in the PMPA compassionate use program, call STEP for more information.





  
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This article was provided by Seattle Treatment Education Project. It is a part of the publication STEP Perspective.
 

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