Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

National News

Council Calls on Bush for HIV Battle Plan

May 20, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The Bush administration should develop a plan to "eliminate" new HIV infections in the United States, the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) has recommended in its first advisory letter to the White House. "We are concerned that a sense of urgency seems lacking" even with 40,000 new HIV infections in the United States each year, members of PACHA said in a May 1 letter to President Bush. "A plan with a time line for eradication of the epidemic should be developed and implemented immediately," they said.

Set up during the Clinton administration to advise the White House on HIV/AIDS policies, PACHA was newly impaneled in March with 26 Bush appointees and 9 previous Clinton appointees. The panel also said they will "revisit current strategies" in AIDS prevention "to determine if they are, indeed, still the most effective methods of prevention education."

PACHA members called for "public and visible leadership" on HIV/AIDS; more funding for the $810 million AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP); more funds for the global fight against AIDS; and easing Medicaid rules so more people with AIDS could be served.

"I do believe in condoms for HIV prevention," PACHA co-chairperson Dr. Tom Coburn told the Advocate in its May 28th issue. "But I also believe in informed consent about the effectiveness of condoms. Ask any expert you want and they will tell you that condoms are not always effective, and people have a right to know this," said Coburn. "If you asked if all gay men were monogamous, would there be fewer HIV infections, the answer is yes," he said. "The consequences of non-monogamy are terrible. It tears up relationships and can make people vulnerable to [STDs]." Coburn called for more emphasis on personal responsibility in HIV campaigns. "If people who know they are-HIV positive, whether straight or gay, would simply take care not to give the virus to someone else, we would have 25,000 infections per year instead of 50,000," he said.

Advertisement

Back to other CDC news for May 20, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Washington Times
05.19.02; Cheryl Wetzstein

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More on U.S. HIV Treatment Policy
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement