Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Local and Community News

Pittsburgh: Grant to Fund AIDS Outreach in Black Neighborhoods

November 19, 2002

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force is using a $148,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Minority Health to assist grassroots organizations battling HIV/AIDS in the black community.

The task force will use the grant funds to build partnerships with community collaboratives in the Hill District and Homewood, and with the Seven Project, a support group for black gays. The partnerships also will include the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work and PERSAD, a center that serves the emotional needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender minorities. The task force is naming the initiative HEAP, for Hill/East Access and Prevention Project.

The goal of the initiative is to offer more education and testing and to identify and help at least 350 black residents who are living with HIV without a system of support or care. The task force plans to hire a project coordinator and three community educators. The hope is to offset the rapidly increasing rates of HIV infections among black residents of southwestern Pennsylvania, and across the nation.

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Health, there were 2,043 people living with HIV in Allegheny County in March. An estimated 800 of them are black.

Advertisement
"We can't do this alone," said Bob Feikema, executive director of the task force. "We need the assistance and support of community groups." The task force plans to link clients with case managers, facilitate their access to local treatment services and state and local programs that offer medications, and help them make decisions on insurance issues. Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen A. Zappala Jr. and his wife, Mary, are chairing the task force's fund-raising campaign.

Back to other CDC news for November 19, 2002

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
11.15.02; Ervin Dyer

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More Research on Switching HIV Treatments

Tools
 

Advertisement