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Food for Thought

Winter 1998/1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

According to the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest, these are the 10 foods that you need to eat to ensure good nutrition and low-fat in your diet:
  • Sweet potatoes. "A nutritional all-star" -- one of the most nutritious vegetables you can eat. They are loaded with carotenoids, fiber, potassium and vitamin C.

  • Whole grain bread. Higher in fiber and with over a dozen more vitamins and minerals than white or "wheat" flour.

  • Broccoli. Filled with vitamin C, carotenoids, and folic acid.

  • Strawberries. An excellent choice for loads of vitamin C and fiber. Organically grown berries reduce the risks of pesticide residue.

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  • Beans. Garbanzo, navy, kidney, pinto, lentil, or black all are inexpensive and rich in protein, iron, and fiber.

  • Cantaloupe. Only a quarter of a melon supplies the average person with most of the daily needed vitamin A and C.

  • Spinach and kale. Popeye was right, these are both loaded with calcium, fiber, and vitamin C.

  • Oranges. These sweet and juicy fruits are filled with vitamin C, fiber and folic acid.

  • Oatmeal. Whole grain oatmeal is inexpensive and has no added sugar or fat.

  • Fat-free (skim) or 1% milk. Great source of calcium, vitamins, and protein, with little or no artery-clogging fat.


A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Seattle Treatment Education Project. It is a part of the publication STEP Perspective.
 
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