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Notice to Readers -- HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis Registry Closing

March 12, 1999

Effective December 31, 1998, enrollment of new health-care workers (HCWs) in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis (HIV PEP) Registry ceased; the goals and objectives of the registry had been met. In addition, continuation of the registry appeared redundant with other ongoing surveillance programs.

The HIV PEP Registry was established in October 1996 as a prospective surveillance project to monitor adverse events associated with HIV PEP in HCWs after occupational HIV exposures. It was a collaborative project managed by CDC and two pharmaceutical companies, Glaxo Wellcome Inc. and Merck & Co., Inc.* A designated third party, a contract research organization, responsible for registration and follow-up, served as the data coordination center.

The registry data have shown that HCWs for whom HIV PEP is prescribed have not reported unusual adverse events (i.e., those not included in the prescribing information or literature) with these treatments. Data suggest that careful counseling about drug toxicity may be necessary to improve compliance with PEP among exposed HCWs. Six-week follow-up of enrolled HCWs will be completed.

Additional information about the registry is available from the HIV PEP Registry, telephone (toll-free) (888) 737-4448 until June 30, 1999, and afterwards from CDC's Hospital Infections Program, telephone (404) 639-6425. Serious adverse events or product problems can be reported to the Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program, telephone (800) 332-1088; fax (800) 332-0178; address: HF-2, FDA, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852-9787; or by the World-Wide Web, www.fda.gov/medwatch.

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* Use of trade names and commercial sources does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or CDC.



  
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This article was provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a part of the publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Visit the CDC's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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