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Notice to Readers: National Latino AIDS Awareness Day -- October 15, 2005

October 14, 2005

The third annual National Latino AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD) is October 15. NLAAD is sponsored by the Latino Commission on AIDS to encourage awareness, prevention, and testing of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the Latino community. This year's theme, "Love Yourself. Protect Yourself. Get Tested for HIV." highlights the need for Latinos at risk to receive counseling and testing and to know their HIV status.

In 2003, the HIV diagnosis rate among Hispanic males in 32 states was more than twice that of non-Hispanic white males, and the rate among Hispanic females was nearly four times that of non-Hispanic white females.1 An estimated 176,000 Hispanics in the United States are living with HIV. Among Hispanics, HIV/AIDS remains a leading cause of death among both men and women2,3 and is an urgent health threat to Latino communities.

Additional information about NLAAD, including local events being held in recognition of National Latino AIDS Awareness Day, is available at www.nlaad.org and www.omhrc.gov/hivaidsobservances.


References

  1. CDC. Diagnoses of HIV/AIDS -- 32 states, 2000-2003. MMWR 2004;53:1106--10.
  2. Glynn M, Rhodes P. Estimated HIV prevalence in the United States at the end of 2003. 2005 National HIV Prevention Conference; June 12-15, 2005; Atlanta, GA. Available at www.aegis.com/conferences/nhivpc/2005/T1-B1101.html.
  3. Anderson RN, Smith BL. Deaths: leading causes for 2002. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2005;53(17).




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