Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Beverly Bergman: "So That No One Should Have to Suffer ..."

Fall 2001

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

As her dying father suffered in excruciating pain, Beverly Bergman felt helpless. Her father's pain was never properly managed, despite her pleas for stronger medication. The hospital staff ignored her requests for morphine, the drug that had eased her mother's last days when she too died of lung cancer.

Outraged after their father's death, and plagued with memories of his pain, the Bergman family sought help. Beverly contacted friend who eventually led her to Compassion in Dying. Compassion investigated the record, consulted medical experts and drafted a letter to the Medical Board of California. When the board took no action the family agreed that filling a lawsuit was the best chance to benefit other patients. Beverly, her brother Robert and sister Alice acted "so that no one should have to suffer the way [their] father did."

Beverly's commitment in memory of her father became a three-year act of love and advocacy. She drew on her training as a drug abuse counselor and mental health advocate for the skills to represent those who cannot speak for themselves.

Since the verdict, Beverly has talked with others who saw a parent die under similar circumstances. Her experience comforts and empowers them. She has appeared on radio and TV and testified before legislative committees. Her three-year campaign exemplifies the power of one person to effect social change.

Advertisement

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Compassion in Dying. It is a part of the publication Compassion in Dying.
 
See Also
More on Pain Management and HIV/AIDS

Tools
 

Advertisement