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The Body Covers: The XIII International AIDS Conference
Response to Salvage With Efavirenz: Implications for Sequencing Antiretroviral Therapy

July 12, 2000

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

  • Response to salvage with efavirenz: implications for sequencing antiretroviral therapy (Poster, WePeB4195)
    Authored by P. Keiser, W. Williams, L. Evans, W. O'Brien, D. Skiest


Can efavirenz be used successfully in those who have already developed resistance to another non-nucleoside? While there are reasons based on genotypic testing to expect that it could, the results of this cohort study suggest otherwise. The researchers reported on the initial outcomes of 67 patients who were all given efavirenz after having been treated with multiple other regimens. This group had taken a median of seven prior antivirals. This included some people who had already taken one of the other non-nucleosides (nevirapine or delavirdine). Unfortunately, the predictors of failure on the efavirenz-containing regimen -- including past use of another non-nucleoside -- with this group twice as likely to see viral rebound than those who had not taken a non-nucleoside in the past. The number of genotypic mutations known to confer resistance to the non-nucleoside class was also correlated with subsequent rebound on efavirenz.

This study confirms the work done by several others that suggest that there is significant cross-resistance in the currently available non-nucleoside antivirals. Thus, it appears that if one of these meds has already been taken in a non-suppressive regimen, another one of the current group is unlikely to be successful. Research continues to hopefully develop new active agents in this class that will not be as cross-resistant as these have been.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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