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The Body Covers: The 7th European Conference on Clinical Aspects and Treatment of HIV-Infection
Improved Tolerability and Adherence with Reduced Mass Didanosine Tablets in HIV-1 Infected Adults Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

October 1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Authored by A. Harling, S. Doshi, H. Leake, et al.

Abstract 503

Discussion

Recently , the FDA in the US has approved a new formulation of ddI (also known as Videx or didanosine). While the drug can be very successful, it is one of the antivirals that is less well tolerated by some due to the need to package it with an antacid buffer. In this study, researchers compared the new reduced mass ddI tablets (200 mg) with the prior formulation, which is usually given as 100 mg tablets. The reduced mass tablets allow for once daily dosing with two tablets compared to four tablets with the older preparation. (The success of once a day ddI compared to its use in the standard twice a day approach has been seen in several studies.)

Of 76 participants, 73 (96%) reported that they preferred taking the new formulation. Two had no preference and one actually preferred the original 100 mg tablets. The following improvements in side effects were reported:

Symptom

% reporting

Less bloating 16
Less flatulence 19
Less nausea 25
Less diarrhea 22


Further, 15% said they liked the taste of the new tablet better and 16% said the new formulation dissolved more easily. One fifth of patients reported that their adherence had improved after taking the 200 mg tablet and 16% said that they would not have been able to remain on ddI if it were not for the reduced side effects with the new formulation.

This study may be useful information for those now on ddI who are doing well in terms of viral control, but not tolerating this formulation of the drug. This study showed that the reduced-mass ddI tablet may decrease the usual side effects of ddI, which may increase someone's willingness to stay on the medication and the overall success of any regimen.


A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
More on HIV Medications
More Research on ddI (Didanosine, Videx)



  
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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