Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary
The Body Covers: The 2001 National Conference on African Americans and AIDS
Public Policy

February 19, 2001

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

    • A. Cornelius Baker


    Cornelius Baker eloquently called the audience to participate actively in public policy decisions affecting African American communities by voicing opinions on several levels. Acknowledging that African Americans have come a long way and won some battles in the war against HIV, there were sobering data discussed by several speakers -- notably the recently released data showing 33% HIV infection rates among African American gay men, as well as the rapidly rising infection rates among African Americans in general. Baker emphasized the need for continued prevention, citing the tremendous success of prevention of vertical transmission. He challenged communities to work together to implement multi-pronged efforts at prevention.

    The need for political activism is underscored by the fact that as a nation we find ourselves at a crossroads with a new government, president, and congress. The question was raised as to whether support for prevention programs and Ryan White funding would continue. Baker reminded the audience that within 30 days of the conference President Bush was scheduled to make a decision on how to maintain the Office of National HIV Prevention, as well as to present his FY 2002 budget. He encouraged the audience to contact the White House by letter or by telephone to convey the importance of maintaining the HIV commitment. On local levels, audience members were urged to speak with congresspersons about appropriations and service needs in communities, and to hold leaders accountable for a concerted national plan against HIV.

    Finally, Baker stressed the power of the vote, and the importance of making one's voice heard through votes. He urged providers and community based organizations to conduct voter registration campaigns and encourage clients to vote in elections at all levels.

    Asked about the threat to 501c status of organizations which conduct these campaigns, Baker reassured the audience that as long as no candidate or bill with partisan impact is endorsed, organizations could spend up to 10% of their funds on lobbying activities. In response to a challenge from a member of the audience, he encouraged community advisory boards and Community-based organizations to strive to stay in touch with the communities they serve, and to interact with and listen to members of these communities.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
10 Black HIV/AIDS Advocates Who Are Making a Difference
More Info and Guides on HIV Activism
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by The Body PRO. Copyright © Body Health Resources Corporation. All rights reserved.


Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

Advertisement