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The Body Covers: The 3rd International Conference on Nutrition and HIV Infection
HAART, Dyslipidemia, and Hyperglycemia

April 22-25, 1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

HAART has been associated with the frequent appearance of dyslipidemia -- elevated total and LDL cholesterol, decreased HDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides -- as well as hyperglycemia leading to diabetes. Dr. Morris Shambelan from San Francisco summarized the current understanding of lipid metabolism in HIV infection. Prior to the HAART/PI-era the most common lipid abnormalities reported were elevations in serum triglycerides and declines in total cholesterol related to increased de novo lipogenesis and lipolysis. Post-HAART, post-PI triglyceride elevations are more marked and now associated with cholesterol elevation also. There is controversy about the potential clinical significance of these alterations. Case reports of presumably lipid-related coronary artery disease in individuals with HIV infection have been appearing. Fat redistribution syndrome mimics a non-HIV metabolic syndrome (Syndrome X) with a very high incidence of coronary and other vascular complications. The possibility of an aging (due to increased survival) population of men and women with HIV infection developing similar complications is both real and frightening. Dr. Carl Grunfeld previously demonstrated that the risk of these complications in HIV infection might actually be quite modest and much less than the risk from traditional cardiac risk factors such as smoking. Indeed the risk of death from untreated HIV infection and AIDS is much higher.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
More on HIV Medications
More Research on Protease Inhibitors



  
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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