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The Body Covers: The 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Session 50, Abstract 377: d4T+3TC versus AZT+3TC

February 3, 1998

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Shattering the synergy story

A number of trials showed that the combination of d4T+3TC is at least as effective as AZT+3TC, suggesting that d4T may be more attractive than AZT as part of a combination therapy regimen for many patients. Foudraine and colleagues reported on an open-label randomized 24-week trial originally designed to compare the efficacy of two dual-nucleoside regimens: d4T (stavudine, or Zerit) + 3TC (lamuvidine, or Epivir) versus AZT+3TC. Forty-seven treatment-naïve patients were randomized, 45 began treatment, and 39 had completed 24 weeks of study by the time of the presentation (19 patients on the d4T arm, 20 patients on the AZT arm).

For those patients whose viral load was over 500 copies per ml at week 8 of the study, the protease inhibitor indinavir (Crixivan) was added. At week 12, any patient who wished to add indinavir was allowed to do so. By week 24, 95% of those taking AZT+3TC had added indinavir, while 84% of the d4T+3TC arm had done so.

After 24 weeks, 100% of patients on the d4T+3TC+indinavir arm had viral loads below detection (One important point: all patients became 3TC-resistant quickly before starting indinavir, suggesting that in the absence of at least two other drugs (preferably including a protease inhibitor), 3TC's effect is limited in duration.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
More Research on HIV/AIDS Treatment Strategies



  
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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