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The Body Covers: The 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Session 86, Abstract 692: Efavirenz + Indinavir

February 4, 1998

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

In this study, a new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor called efavirenz (also known as DMP-266 or the brand name Sustiva) was given once-daily in combination with the potent protease inhibitor indinavir, also known as Crixivan, to patients who had nucleoside analogue (AZT, ddI, ddC, d4T) experience.

In the first 12 weeks of this study of 101 patients, 59 received the combination of efavirenz (EFV) and IDV, while 42 at first received only indinavir, but they added efavirenz and d4T at week 12 of the study. Results at 60 weeks found that 89 percent of patients receiving the two-drug combination therapy from the start of the study achieved and maintained suppression of HIV-RNA to below the limit of detection (< 400 copies/mL), with 81% actually going below 40 copies/ml. Patients experienced an average CD4 cell count increase of 267 cells/mm3.

As would be expected, patients who began EFV and indinavir from the start did better than those who added EFV and d4T at week 12. Among these patients, only 68% were undetectable at week 60, and they had a median CD4 increase of 210 cells/mm3.

EFV seems well-tolerated. In this study, the most commonly reported side effects from the regimens containing efavirenz included headache, rash, fatigue, insomnia, diarrhea, dizziness, flu-like symptoms and nausea. Severe rashes have been a problem with other NNRTIs like delavirdine and nevirapine, but in this study only three patients were discontinued due to rash. Indinavir was well-tolerated.

The study suggests the development of a two-drug regimen, with its easier dosing requirements, that can be as potent as the now traditional "triple cocktail".

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

See Also
More Research on HIV/AIDS Treatment Strategies



  
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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