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The Body Covers: The 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Late Breaker No. LB10: The Spectrum and Frequency of Reduced Antiretroviral Drug Susceptibility With Primary HIV Infection in the United States

February 4, 1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Evaluating the susceptibility to therapy of viral isolates obtained from 69 individuals from Boston, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles and San Diego, Little and colleagues further demonstrate the rise of drug-resistant HIV transmission. In this study, all specimens were collected soon after virus exposure (an average of 79 days, range 0-239 days) from individuals who presented with primary HIV infection. The mean CD4 count in these individuals measured 548 and the mean RNA PCR measured 83,000 copies. The ViroLogicTM assay was used to measure drug susceptibility of these isolates as compared to that of a control virus (NL4-3 virus), and was expressed as either moderate decreased susceptiblity (more than 2.5 to 10 times less susceptible to the drug compared to the contol virus) or major decreased susceptibility (more than 10 times less susceptible):

Moderate decreased
susceptibilty
> 1 NRTI3%
> 1 NNRTI14%
> 1 PI13%
Major decreased
susceptibilty
> 1 NRTI3%
> 1 NNRTI1%
> 1 PI3%

Oddly, most of the NNRTI resistant isolates came from participants in San Diego. However, resistance to all available NNRTIs, NRTIs and PIs were detected. Overall, reduced susceptibility to one or more drugs was seen in 28% in the study population, underscoring a need for continued emphasis of safe-sex practices, and making a stong case for the use of genotypic and phenotypic assays before instituting therapy in persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Abstract: The Spectrum and Frequency of Reduced Antiretroviral Drug Susceptibility With Primary HIV Infection in the United States
Authored by: S. Little, E. Daar, P. Keiser, R. D'Aquila, E. Connick, N. Hellman, C. Petropoulos, R. Koup, E. Rosenberg, B. Walker, and D. Richman

See Also
The Body's Guide to HIV Drug Resistance
HIV Mutations



  
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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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