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The Body Covers: The 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections
Abstract No. 603: Resistance Profile and Drug Combination Studies of an HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor BMS-232632

February 3, 1999

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

This presentation by Gong and colleagues at Bristol-Myers Squibb provides in vitro data of a new protease inhibitor in development that promises desirable features of once daily dosing, good tolerability and a resistance profile that appears (at this time) to differ markedly from the existing group of protease inhibitors.

An azapeptide, this protease inhibitor exhibits EC50 values well below the currently licensed group of protease inhibitors, with values of 2-5 nM., which is also well below the concentration of drug that induces cellular toxicity (CC50=2850 microM). Serial passage of virus in the presence of drug (to induce resistance mutations) demonstrated a delayed appearance of mutations (relative to saquinavir and ritonavir) and then the appearance of a different mutation N88S upon genotypic analysis. Cross resistance studies involving 5 other protease inhibitors indicated that BMS-232632 resistant virus remained sensitive to saquinavir while showing some resistance to nelfinavir, ritonavir, indinavir and amprenavir. In reciprocal cross resistance studies testing the sensitivity to BMS-232632 of strains resistant to nelfinavir, saquinavir and amprenavir, these viruses demonstrated sensitivity to the drug, while indinavir and ritonavir resistant virus displayed partial cross-resistance to BMS-232632.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Abstract: Resistance Profile and Drug Combination Studies of an HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor BMS-232632
Authored by: Y. Gong, B. Robinson, R. Rose, K. Riccardi, C. Deminie, D. Stock, T. Spicer, F. Djang, J. Cross, R. Colonno, and P.F. Lin

See Also
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More News and Research on Atazanavir (Reyataz)



  
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