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A Comprehensive Look at Clinical Trials

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Financial Considerations

There should be no financial cost to you as a trial participant. Trial medication is always free, and the drug company or research site conducting the trial usually pays for all lab tests. However, some trials expect your private insurance or Medicaid to pay for some lab tests and other medications that might be used. Make sure that you understand how this works before agreeing to join.

Some trials pay participants. There are different reasons for getting paid to participate in a trial:

  • For your time
    Some trials require visits that last much longer than a normal doctor's visit. For example, you may stay overnight in the hospital to have doses of trial medications administered. In those circumstances, you may receive compensation for your time.

  • For an uncomfortable procedure
    Some studies require multiple blood draws, X-rays, pap smears, etc. You may receive compensation for your discomfort if you consent to such procedures.

  • For assuming risk with little benefit to you
    You may receive compensation for taking on the risks of receiving an experimental medication, especially if it may not directly benefit you. This is common in Phase I trials.

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    The clinic may provide funds to cover transportation, food, and/or childcare. Ask your research nurse about such funds.

Some Thoughts on Payment

Your health comes first. The highest paying trials are usually Phase I trials. These trials can be time-consuming and risky. They may require you to stop taking all of your other anti-HIV medications. Make the decision to join a clinical trial based on the possible benefits to your health, not for the money.



  
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This article was provided by AIDS Community Research Initiative of America. Visit ACRIA's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 

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