Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

Roy Gulick, MD, MPH Comments On the Future of HIV/AIDS Research

Summer 2001

Roy Gulick, MD, MPH: Associate Professor of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Director, Cornell Clinical Trials Unit

The goal of clinical research is to use laboratory discoveries to develop and perform studies in human subjects with the hope of defining new and better treatment strategies for a disease or illness. HIV clinical researchers first tested combinations of drugs that have reduced HIV-related illness and death dramatically over the last five years. Despite this success, clinical studies remain critical for continued advancements in several important areas:

  • new drugs continue to be needed for patients who have exhausted all available treatment options or who cannot tolerate the current drugs; examples are drugs with new ways of working, such as the HIV entry inhibitors T-1249 and AMD-3100, and the HIV integrase inhibitor, S-1360;
  • immune boosters, such as HIV vaccines, need to be tested to supplement the current anti-HIV drugs; one example are the new HIV DNA therapeutic vaccines to be tested in patients doing well on their current HIV combination regimens;
  • simplification of current treatments will promote better adherence and a better quality of life for patients while maintaining strong antiviral activity; examples include comparing current HIV treatment combinations to a single pill that contains three separate drugs given twice a day or newer once-a-day treatment regimens;
  • Advertisement

  • side effect treatments and strategies are important to try to reduce both acute and longer-term complications associated with the therapies; one example are drugs that lower levels of lipids (blood fats);
  • hepatitis C treatments need to be improved and tested in patients who are co-infected with HIV and the hepatitis C virus; examples include the use of combination therapies of interferon and ribavirin and the use of additional novel strategies such as pre-treatment with interleukin-2 (T cell growth factor).

One of the effects of the significant progress we have made in HIV treatment is that healthcare providers and HIV-infected individuals may be less inclined to think of research studies as an option. To ensure continued progress in the field, we must continue to support participation in HIV clinical research efforts.





  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary
  • PDF PDF

This article was provided by AIDS Community Research Initiative of America. It is a part of the publication CRIA Update. Visit ACRIA's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 

Tools
 

Advertisement