Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Comparing Three Viruses: HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C

October 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

  HIV Hepatitis B (HBV) Hepatitis C (HCV)
EPI Slowly progressing disease, with ~10 years to life threatening stage. High mortality if untreated. Transmitted by blood, sex, and from mother to child. Not easy to transmit. Slowly progressing disease with ~40 years to life threatening stage. 5% to 25% mortality if untreated. Transmitted by blood, sex, and from mother to child. Extremely easy to transmit. Slowly progressing disease with ~20 years to life threatening stage. Uncertain mortality if untreated. Transmitted by blood, sex, and from mother to child. Easy to transmit.
Therapy No vaccine available. Viral eradication not possible. Effective vaccine is available. Eradication is unlikely. No vaccine available. Viral eradication is possible.
Lifetime therapy required. Lifetime therapy required to control chronic, replicating disease. Duration of therapy ranges from 6 months to 1 year for ~50% success rate.
Viral suppression with therapy offers clinical benefits. Immune recovery is possible. Therapy may offer clinical benefits. Recovery from liver damage is possible. Conversion from chronic replicating to inactive state is possible. Therapy may offer clinical benefits despite failure to eradicate. Recovery from liver damage is possible.
Disease progresses if therapy is halted. Life-threatening flares are possible if therapy is halted. Disease progression is possible if therapy is halted.
 Lifecycles of HIV Infection, HBV Infection and HCV Infection
  Retrovirus Hepadnavirus Flaviviridae Virus
Virology Contains 2 strands of RNA. Usually contains 2 circular strands of DNA. Contains 1 strand of RNA.
Infects immune cells using CD4 receptors by fusion with cell membrane. The genetic material (RNA) is uncoated in the cytoplasm. DNA is transrcibed by RT in the cytoplasm then delivered to the nucleus and integrated into the nuclear DNA. Infects liver cells using an uncertain receptor. Cell membrane fusion is likely. The genetic material (DNA) is delivered directly into the nucleus where it resides as circular DNA. Pre-genomic RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and reverse transcribed to genomic DNA. Infects liver cells using uncertain receptors. Fusion occurs within a vesicle. The genetic material (RNA) is uncoated in the cytoplasm and never enters the nucleus. Templates for the genomic RNA are produced in the cytoplasm.
New virus is produced when the cell divides. RNA exported from the nucleus and viral proteins produced in the cytoplasm are packaged using cellular membrane. New virus is produced when the cell divides. Viral proteins are produced in the ER and packaged with genomic DNA in the Golgi. New virus production is stimulated by infection. Viral proteins are produced and packaged with genomic RNA in the cytoplasm using vesicle membranes.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Gay Men's Health Crisis. It is a part of the publication GMHC Treatment Issues. Visit GMHC's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
Talk to a Physician About HIV/Hepatitis Coinfection in Our "Ask the Experts" Forums
More on Hepatitis C

Tools
 

Advertisement