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Editorial

A Good Year ...

December 1997

The first decade of antiretroviral therapy -- which began when the nucleoside analogs became widely available -- was marked by early optimism... which gave way to frustration and despair when the effectiveness of these early compounds proved transient. The second decade of antiretroviral therapy -- which began when the protease inhibitors became widely available -- was also marked by early optimism, this time tempered by considerable caution. There was no question that these new agents had potent antiretroviral activity: when used in combination with older agents, they produced near-complete suppression of viral replication in a majority of treated patients. The question was: How long would these beneficial effects last?

The answer depends on many factors. Patients who have advanced HIV disease and a long history of AIDS-related illnesses generally do less well than patients with higher CD4 counts and lower viral burdens. Patients who have been treated with many drugs over many years -- and who have, as a result, developed some degree of resistance to some of those drugs -- generally do less well than patients who do not have a long treatment history. And, perhaps most importantly of all, patients who fail to remain compliant with their prescribed antiretroviral regimens do less well than fully adherent patients -- regardless of disease stage or drug history.

But none of these caveats can dim the optimism that physicians and patients alike now feel about the future of HIV therapy. Large numbers of treated patients have achieved clinical stability on combination antiretroviral therapy, and many of those patients have seen their CD4 counts, their overall health, and their outlook on life rebound within months of beginning one of these powerful multidrug regimens.

Many factors have contributed to this sea-change in our collective outlook. Clinicians have gained considerable experience in dealing with HIV disease and with AIDS-related opportunistic infections, learning how to tailor drug regimens to the particular needs of particular patients. Patients have learned how to incorporate the demands of multidrug dosing schedules into their daily routines. And pharmaceutical companies have learned how to target HIV with greater specificity and greater effect. These advances offer physicians and their patients more effective options than ever before, and therefore they offer more hope than ever before.

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Because the treatment of HIV infection has become such a dynamic and fast-changing field, the editors of AIDS Care have developed a comprehensive glossary of more than 300 names, terms, and acronyms that are commonly used by healthcare professionals who treat people with HIV infection. That alphabetical listing, which appears in the special Pull Out and Save section of this issue, is designed to provide you with a handy "dictionary" that you can consult whenever you come across a word or phrase that is unfamiliar to you. Our aim in providing you with this glossary is to make it even easier for you to participate in decisions about the care you are receiving.

Paul A. Volberding, M.D., is Editor-in-Chief of AIDS Care and AIDS Program Director at San Francisco General Hospital.


COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Editorials, articles, and news summaries ©1997 The Dorrance Company, Inc.

All text rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior permission. Permission to reproduce any figure appearing in these pages must be obtained directly from the source cited in the figure caption.





  
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This article was provided by San Francisco General Hospital. It is a part of the publication AIDS Care.
 

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