Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Commentary & Opinion

Bush Administration Should Not "Shortchange" First Year of Global AIDS Initiative, Opinion Piece Says

August 21, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The congressional delegation to Africa led by Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) should "investigate the White House claim that the AIDS-stricken region cannot use an additional billion dollars in funding to fight the pandemic," Dr. Paul Spearman, a member of Physicians for Human Rights' Health Action AIDS and an associate professor at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, writes in a Tennessean opinion piece (Spearman, Tennessean, 8/21). Bush in May signed into law in a measure (HR 1298) that authorizes $15 billion over five years to fight AIDS in Africa and the Caribbean. The House so far has approved a total of $2 billion for the AIDS initiative in fiscal year 2004, an increase of about $500 million over FY 2003 AIDS spending (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 8/5). The $2 billion represents only two-thirds of the $3 billion authorized in HR 1298 but fulfills Bush's budget request of $2 billion (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 7/31). According to Spearman, the administration says that the health infrastructure in Africa is "too weak to absorb" the full $3 billion, but the administration should not "shortchang[e]" prevention efforts in the program's first year. "As a physician-scientist working in the field of HIV/AIDS, I know that treatment programs in impoverished communities without advanced health care infrastructures can be successful," Spearman says, adding that there is "no time to waste" and that "[s]ometimes throwing money at a problem can be the right approach." Spearman concludes that "[t]he longer the United States waits, the more difficult it becomes to build capacity and tackle the disease tearing at the very heart of communities throughout Africa" (Tennessean, 8/21).

Back to other news for August 21, 2003


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2003 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More Viewpoints on U.S. Global HIV/AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

Tools
 

Advertisement