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Policy & Politics

National Journal Uses Global AIDS Initiative as Example of "Mismatch Between Rhetoric, Reality" in Appropriations Process

August 8, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The real success of a federal program, such as President Bush's five-year, $15 billion global AIDS initiative (HR 1298), "is not its creation, but whether it receives the money it needs," National Journal reports in a cover story in its Aug. 2 issue on the congressional appropriations process. When the House in May passed the bill authorizing $3 billion a year for five years to fight AIDS in Africa and the Caribbean, International Relations Committee Chair Henry Hyde (R-Ill.) said that Congress "rarely" acts with such "decisiveness for the benefit of so many suffering in the developing world," according to National Journal. "[I]t turns out that Hyde was right," the article says, adding that in the case of the AIDS bill, "[d]espite all the talk," appropriations bills moving through Congress would allocate "only" $2 billion for the first year of the program -- "not the $3 billion promised." In addition, "to provide cover for congressional Republicans," Joseph O'Neill, director of the White House Office of AIDS Policy, sent the committees letters calling the amount "sufficient." National Journal concludes that the AIDS initiative is "just one example of the mismatch between rhetoric and reality in Washington," which is "unlikely to change anytime soon ... [since] [a]uthorizers love their power to create programs, while appropriators relish their power to decide how much money those programs should receive" (Baumann, National Journal, 8/2).

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Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2003 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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