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International News

Overcrowding in Russian Prison System Facilitates Spread of Tuberculosis, HIV, Report Says

July 24, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Overcrowding in Russia's prison system facilitates the spread of tuberculosis and HIV, according to a report presented yesterday to a Council of Europe envoy on his departure for a tour of the country's prison system, Agence France-Presse reports (Loginova, Agence France-Presse, 7/23). In April, Vadim Pokrovsky, head of the Russian Health Ministry's AIDS Prevention and Treatment Center, said that Russia has reported 235,000 HIV/AIDS cases, but the actual number of cases could be between 700,000 and 1.5 million, including about 37,000 prison inmates (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 4/18). Some temporary detention centers are filled to 200% capacity. The Helsinki-Moscow Group, a human rights organization, with funding from the European Commission, compiled the report in May with the help of local advocates in Russia's 89 regions. The group inspected 117 penitentiary establishments, including 74 work camps, 41 preliminary detention centers and two prisons. The group gave the report to Michel Hunault, the Council of Europe's Parliamentary Assembly prison rapporteur, at the beginning of an investigative tour of the country's facilities. More than 86,000 of Russia's 877,000 inmates -- about one in 10 -- have TB, according to data released in January. Due to inadequate treatment, about 30% of those inmates have developed or been infected with drug-resistant forms of the disease, the report found. In addition, Russian prison authorities often discriminate against HIV-positive people and keep them in "exaggerated isolation," the report said (Agence France-Presse, 7/23).

Back to other news for July 24, 2003


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2003 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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