Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Commentary & Opinion

HIV/AIDS Vaccine Research Must Be "Top Priority," Opinion Piece Says

October 6, 2003

The research and development of a vaccine against HIV -- "the deadliest natural infectious disease in history" -- "must be the top priority" for the United States, Mark Jensen, a senior fellow at the University of Washington, where he helps direct the HIV Computational Biology Group, says in a Seattle Post-Intelligencer opinion piece. According to Jensen, the "new new economy" and recent efforts to protect against threats of bioterrorism "tempt legislators to divert existing AIDS funding" to other areas. However, it is "more important than ever that the United States maintain its leadership in HIV and AIDS research through public and private support, for the best hope of a cure and global stability," Jensen says. HIV/AIDS research has been a "scientific tour-de-force unparalleled since the space race of the '60s," he writes. Specifically, Jensen notes that antiretroviral drugs have made HIV/AIDS "a chronic, but manageable disease -- if mainly in the developed world -- and have led to novel therapies for other viral diseases." However, "these advances have led to an unjustified complacency toward AIDS and AIDS research," Jensen says, adding that in the "face of our drug arsenal," HIV "remains vigilant," with drug-resistant strains spreading throughout the United States and Europe. According to Jensen, new HIV drugs are being developed "constantly," but they are "always expensive and the virus has only so many weak spots" to target. Jensen says that efforts to provide generic HIV/AIDS treatments to developing nations "must continue," but attention must also be paid to the "growing risk that these will meet a beachhead of an established, resistant epidemic." Jensen concludes, "Our foremost responsibility to the future remains to subdue the greatest harm for the good of the greatest number" through an HIV/AIDS vaccine (Jensen, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 10/2).

Back to other news for October 6, 2003


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2003 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More HIV News

Tools
 

Advertisement