Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Commentary & Opinion

Bush Administration, Congress "Walking Away" From Global AIDS Initiative Funding, Editorial Says

September 15, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

President Bush and members of Congress appear to be "walking away" from a "highly praised" pledge to fund the five-year, $15 billion global AIDS initiative, a move that "will devastate already strained efforts to stem the full gallop of AIDS across the African continent," a Miami Herald editorial says (Miami Herald, 9/14). Although the measure (HR 1298) supporting Bush's global AIDS initiative authorizes $3 billion for the first year of the program, the Bush administration has requested only $2 billion. In addition, the Senate on Tuesday rejected 43-51 an amendment to the fiscal year 2004 $137.6 billion spending bill for labor, health and education services (HR 2660) that would have increased by $1 billion the funding for the global AIDS initiative. The amendment, sponsored by Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), would have added $1 billion to the roughly $2 billion already appropriated by the Senate for the initiative. The Senate in July passed a nonbinding resolution, called the Bingaman amendment, calling for $3 billion to be appropriated in FY 2004 to fight AIDS overseas, even if the amount exceeds the ceiling mandated in Congress' annual budget resolution. The House has approved approximately $2 billion for the AIDS initiative in FY 2004 (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 9/11). Although Bush seemed to be "walk[ing] the walk" while in Africa in July by pledging $15 billion over five years to the initiative, African leaders and AIDS advocates are now "left to wonder if the speechifying [about the initiative] was no more than a photo-op," the editorial says. The Herald concludes that Congress should appropriate the full $3 billion for the first year of the initiative when the measure goes to conference committee because anything less could "cause irreparable harm, because more people will die -- it's that simple" (Miami Herald, 9/14).

Back to other news for September 15, 2003


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2003 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More Viewpoints on U.S. Global HIV/AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement