Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Medical News

Johnson & Johnson to Grant License to International Partnership for Microbicides for Experimental Microbicide

March 30, 2004

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Johnson & Johnson on Monday at the Microbicides Conference 2004 in London announced it has granted royalty-free rights to the International Partnership for Microbicides for an experimental microbicide originally developed by J&J subsidiary Tibotec Pharmaceuticals, the Financial Times reports (Dyer, Financial Times, 3/29). Microbicides include a range of products such as gels, films, sponges and other products that could help prevent the sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. Although HIV is transmitted primarily through heterosexual intercourse in much of Africa and Asia, no female-controlled HIV prevention method currently is widely available (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 3/24). The drug, known as TMC-120, is the first potential microbicide to specifically target HIV in a manner similar to that of antiretroviral drugs, according to the Wall Street Journal (Windham, Wall Street Journal, 3/29). Tibotec initially had developed TMC-120 as an antiretroviral drug but has since produced the compound in gel form for use as a microbicide. The company has completed early stage clinical trials of the drug, and IPM under the agreement will conduct the remaining trials necessary for regulatory approval, which could cost between $50 million and $100 million. If the drug reaches the market, Tibotec would have the right to market it in developed countries but would be required to pay a royalty to IPM. IPM Research Director Mark Mitchnick said that the group had "high hopes" for the "highly potent compound" because it is cheap to produce and chemically stable, according to the Times (Financial Times, 3/29). If the trials are successful, the product could be on the market by 2010, the Journal reports (Wall Street Journal, 3/29).

MPR's "Marketplace Morning Report" on Monday reported on the Johnson & Johnson and IPM agreement ("Marketplace Morning Report," MPR, 3/29). The complete segment is available online in RealPlayer.

Back to other news for March 30, 2004


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More News and Research on Microbicides
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement