Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

International News

Cambodian Sex Workers Refuse to Participate in Clinical Trial of Antiretroviral Drug Without Insurance for Side Effects

March 30, 2004

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

A group of Cambodian commercial sex workers has refused to participate in a clinical trial of the antiretroviral drug Viread to determine whether it can prevent HIV infection unless the trial's sponsors guarantee them health insurance for 30 years to treat possible side effects caused by the drug, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 3/29). NIH, CDC and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are funding three separate human studies of Viread, which is manufactured by Gilead Sciences and is FDA-approved for use as a treatment for HIV infection. The drug, which is known generically as tenofovir, has been shown to boost immune response and lower viral levels in the bloodstreams of patients who are resistant to other antiretrovirals. The Gates Foundation has awarded a $6.5 million grant to Family Health International to conduct a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether Viread is effective at reducing the risk of HIV infection. The trial will include 2,000 volunteers in Cambodia, Ghana, Cameroon, Nigeria and Malawi.

Cambodian Trial
NIH has awarded a $2.1 million grant to University of California-San Francisco researchers to test Viread in 960 Cambodian women, most of whom are sex workers (Kaiser Daily Reproductive Health Report, 2/6). The year-long Cambodian study, which is expected to begin in June, will be a collaborative effort between Cambodia's Ministry of Health, UCSF and the University of New South Wales in Australia, according to the AP/Post-Intelligencer. However, about 150 sex workers belonging to the Women's Network for Unity have said they will not participate in the study unless they are provided with 30 years of health insurance to cover possible adverse reactions and side effects from taking the drug (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 3/29). "They said that they don't want to try the drug because they are poor and they are sex workers," WNU President Kao Tha said, adding, "They said if (they) fall ill, who will look after their mothers, children, sisters or brothers?" (AP/Las Vegas Sun, 3/26). Kimberly Page Shafer, a UCSF professor, said that the drug's side effects, which include stomach gas and nausea, are "not serious," according to the AP/Post-Intelligencer. Although the participants will be provided with medical care during the course of the trial, providing them with insurance for 30 years would be "impossible," Page Shafer said. She added, "There's probably no place in the world where women in clinical trial[s] have access to coverage for life." Cambodia was selected for the trial because the country has the highest HIV prevalence in Southeast Asia, according to the AP/Post-Intelligencer. However, the country's HIV prevalence decreased from 3.8% in 1997 to 2.6% in 2002 (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 3/29).

Back to other news for March 30, 2004


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More News and Research on HIV Medications for HIV Prevention
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement