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16 HIV Advocates to Watch in 2016

January 6, 2016

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They come from nearly every corner of the world. They are engaged in local communities and on the international scene. They include mothers, artists, a fugitive, a performer, and a drug smuggler. They are speaking out, acting up, and in some cases risking their personal safety and liberty.


16 HIV Advocates to Watch in 2016

Photo illustration courtesy of PLUS Magazine.


They are the 16 HIV advocates to watch in 2016, and they inspire and humble me. It is such a privilege to share their stories with you and highlight their important work. Their twitter handles and other social media links are included whenever available; I urge you to follow them so these advocates can inspire you all year long!

And now, it is my honor to present ...


Joshua Middleton

Joshua Middleton

Big Bear Lake, California

Straight men living with HIV aren't unicorns. They do exist. But being public about their status means facing an additional layer of ignorance. Joshua Middleton has every intention of changing that. "I'm putting a face on the heterosexual HIV positive male that is often silent in this fight against HIV," says the 25-year-old Californian. "I want to show the world that there is always hope."

Joshua has started his own blog, contributes to TheBody.com, and has dived into the HIV advocacy arena with vigor and youthful enthusiasm. He has become an avid supporter of PrEP, uses his fluidity in multiple languages to share HIV messages, and wants to pursue a law degree for the express purpose of defending those being unfairly prosecuted by HIV criminalization laws.

"He is a loving soul," says Maria Mejia, the popular social media personality and HIV positive advocate. "He represents a new generation of activist and I am always so proud to see a young heterosexual male stepping out of the HIV closet."

"Sitting on the sidelines is not an option for me," says Joshua. "I'm going to be a driving force until the day when HIV becomes yesterday's news."


Kenny Brandmuse

Credit: Olubode Shawn Brown

Kenny Brandmuse

Lagos, Nigeria

If and when Kenny Brandmuse returns to his home of Lagos, Nigeria, the reception might not be a welcome one. Shortly before he left two years ago (escaped might be a better word), he was receiving threatening phone messages from anonymous strangers. "They wanted me punished for my sexuality," says Kenny. "I was already being investigated by the court, and I had to stop attending the hearings because the unfriendly crowds outside the court were becoming larger."

The threat to his safety became too great, so Kenny managed to get to the United States by seeking an advanced degree at a Baltimore college. Then he found the ideal job -- and a work visa -- with the Baltimore Health department to design programs for gay black men that address HIV stigma. He loves the work but can't help but feel anxious about the future, once the visa ends. "It's like walking on needles," Kenny says.

Part of his troubles in Nigeria were due to Kenny being an outspoken gay men living with HIV. Kenny founded Is Anyone In Africa?, an online community for African gay men and those living with HIV. It has helped over 500 men and women receive care without fear of being outed since being launched only one year ago.

For 2016, Kenny has a simply goal: to see a more empowered gay community living in homophobic Sub-Saharan Africa.

Pioneering African gay rights clergyman Jide Rowland Macaulay, founding pastor of House of Rainbows, has a unique understanding of Kenny's journey. "Kenny coming out about his sexuality and HIV status has made many of us come to a place to be realistic and reconcile the odds against discrimination," Jide says. "As a child of Nigeria, he has by default positioned himself carefully as heroic, it is my hope that the nation would find in her heart to celebrate him."

Whether or not Nigeria is ready to celebrate the return of Kenny Brandmuse remains to be seen. His work visa expires in 2018.


Greg Owen

Greg Owen

London, England

If the photo of Greg Owen strikes you as sexually provocative, then he's just doing his job. The London-based advocate likes starting conversations about sex. "It is incredibly important for us as gay men to remain not just sex-positive but to keep reaching and working towards a complete sense of well-being. Emotional, mental, sexual and social," says Greg. "When we are looking after ourselves, we become more resilient in dealing with the curveballs that life sometimes throws."

Greg faced a major curveball only months ago, when he decided to begin taking PrEP himself (because Truvada as PrEP isn't yet available in the United Kingdom, Greg acquired the drug from a friend who had stopped taking it as an HIV treatment med). Everything was in place, until Greg got tested before beginning PrEP and discovered he had become HIV positive since his previous test. His own decision to start PrEP was just a few months too late. His idea to write and share his own "PrEP Diaries" instantly became his "Diagnosis Diaries." His activism did not skip a single beat, culminating with his popular site, "I Want PrEP Now."

Gus Cairns, the enormously influential editor of AIDSMap, is duly impressed. "What I particularly like about Greg is that although he knows what he's doing, he is conspicuously not a saint," he says. "He knows instinctively that the best way to sell HIV prevention is via sex, not by finger-wagging about it. He lives his life rather nakedly in public and is both an inspiration to others but also, now and then, a burden to himself because of it. I follow his activist career with a paternal eye."


Joey Joleen Mataele

Joey Joleen Mataele

Nuku`alofa, Kingdom of Tonga

In Tonga, when a transgender person (known as "leiti") is seen walking down the street, someone might use a cruel shorthand to refer to them. They simply call them "AIDS." It is in that discriminatory environment that Joey Joleen Mataele founded the Tonga Leitis Association in 1992, and she hasn't stopped fighting for her community ever since.

An active figure on the HIV awareness scene, Joleen has witnessed firsthand the harassment and discrimination suffered by LGBTIQ people in Tonga and the South Pacific. But Joleen had a not-so-secret weapon: her own visibility as a singer and entertainer. "The culture of the pacific is open to humor, song and dance," Joleen says. "So, I founded the Miss Galaxy Queen Pageant to raise awareness and to support our community." The pageant event became an enormous phenomenon, raising crucial funding and even garnering the support of Her Royal Highness Princess Salote Lupepau'u Tuita.

Joleen, who is also raising five adopted children at home, is just as ambitious in her goals for 2016. "I want to strengthen the Tonga Leitis community advocacy to effectively address the health, rights and well-being of Tongans and Pacific Islanders of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities," she says, "and to provide an inclusive environment that celebrates diversity in all forms."

"Joleen has been a beacon of hope for those living with HIV and AIDS in the region," says Resitara Apa, former secretariat of the Pacific Diversity Network. "She works to ensure that the people of Tonga are educated about HIV so they stop discrimination and start caring and loving those living with HIV. Keep an eye out for her in 2016 and see her make changes for those who have no voice."

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My Fabulous Disease


Mark S. King has been an active AIDS activist, writer and community organization leader since the early 1980s in Los Angeles. He has been an outspoken advocate for prevention education and for issues important to those living with HIV.

Diagnosed in 1985, Mark has held positions with the Los Angeles Shanti Foundation, AID Atlanta and AIDS Survival Project, and is an award-winning writer. He continues his volunteer work as an AIDS educator and speaker for conferences and events.

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