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Sign on Letter: Office of National AIDS Policy to Support HIV Prevention Resources for Regions With High HIV Diagnosis and Death Rates

April 29, 2015

How to Take Action

If your organization would like to sign on, please click here or e-mail your organization, your name and position, and your willingness to sign the letter.

Deadline is Wednesday, May 6th.

Recent SASI research demonstrates that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) High Impact HIV Prevention Policy creates a “one size fits all” approach that does not adequately address the HIV prevention needs in parts of the country with large rural (non-metropolitan) and suburban (metropolitan areas of 50,000 to 499,000 population) HIV epidemics.

As evidenced by the map below, several Deep South states have a significantly higher percentage of their HIV burden in rural and suburban areas. Overwhelming, these are areas that are ineligible for direct community-based organization funding under the most recent CDC funding announcement (PS15-1502).

Percentage of HIV-positive individuals in the deep South states living outside an MSA eligible for CBO HIV prevention funding.

Percentage of HIV-positive individuals in the deep South states living outside an MSA eligible for CBO HIV prevention funding.

If the PS15-1502 MSA eligibility criteria had been applied to previous CBO funding announcements, southern CBOs would have lost out on a total of $3.8 million in 2004 and $2.5 million in 2010 in direct CDC HIV prevention funding. Because the disease burden in several Deep South States is located outside eligible MSAs, many CBOs that had previously received direct prevention funding nationwide are currently barred from applying for funding under PS15-1502. Although CBOs may also receive some CDC funding indirectly through their state health departments, this funding does not make up for the shortfall created by PS15-1502.

Recent research by SASI and the CDC found that living outside a large urban area at the time of diagnosis significantly predicted greater death rates among persons living with HIV in the Deep South region. Reduced prevention funding for CBOs, groups that are uniquely positioned to reach communities at risk for HIV, will only serve to increase the HIV burden in regions outside the large urban areas where the HIV diagnosis rates and death rates are high.

SASI calls on the Office of National AIDS Policy to:

Expand the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) to add the following critical actions necessary to further reduce HIV infections and to achieve an AIDS-free Generation in the United States:

Adopt a more effective and nuanced approach to HIV Prevention by ensuring that, in addition to resources for large urban areas with heavy HIV burden:

  1. HIV prevention resources are targeted to rural and suburban, under-served areas with high HIV diagnosis rates, high death rates, and low survival rates, among people diagnosed with HIV or AIDS;
  2. HIV prevention efforts in rural and suburban areas are informed by the epidemic profile of each state and tailored geographically by the social and cultural context in each state
  3. HIV prevention efforts targeted to rural and suburban areas support and evaluate capacity to provide HIV prevention and care at the state, local and community-based organization levels.

If your organization would like to sign on, please click here or e-mail your organization, your name and position, and your willingness to sign the letter.

Deadline is Wednesday, May 6th.

Sign-on letter to Douglas Brooks, ONAP (PDF)
CDC CBO funding paper -- One Size Does Not Fit All (PDF)


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This article was provided by Southern HIV/AIDS Strategy Initiative.
 

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