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Press Release

CDC Launches "Start Talking. Stop HIV."

A New National HIV Prevention Campaign for Gay and Bisexual Men

May 21, 2014

Start Talking. Stop HIV.

We are pleased to announce the latest communication campaign under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Act Against AIDS initiative. This new national HIV prevention campaign, Start Talking. Stop HIV., was created by and for gay and bisexual men. It promotes open communication about a range of HIV prevention strategies for sexual partners. The campaign is designed to inspire practical, lifesaving conversations among gay and bisexual men, who continue to be the population most severely affected by HIV in the United States.

This multi-faceted campaign was developed in consultation with 500 men of multiple ages from different racial and ethnic groups from across the United States. It is based on research that shows communication between sexual partners is associated with reduced risk behavior and increased HIV testing and HIV status disclosure.

Start Talking. Stop HIV. features messages that engage, inspire, and spark conversations between sexual partners and provides gay and bisexual men with practical tools and tips for bringing up important HIV prevention topics like:

  • HIV testing and their HIV status,
  • Condoms and engaging in lower-risk sexual behaviors,
  • Medicines that prevent and treat HIV, including the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The campaign will initially launch in south Florida, a region with high HIV prevalence among gay and bisexual men. Start Talking. Stop HIV. will roll-out in other cities during PRIDE events throughout the year. Campaign images and messages will appear in mobile, online, and national and local print advertising and will be the focus of a national media relations effort to generate print and broadcast news stories.

You can watch exclusive, behind-the-scenes footage of the Start Talking. Stop HIV. campaign and public service announcements on the campaign website.

You can support the campaign and increase conversation about HIV by:

Start Talking. Stop HIV. poster
  • Forwarding this letter to your networks. Start talking and share the news about the new campaign throughout your network via an e-mail or posting on your organization's website.
  • Using campaign materials. Download digital banner ads and videos from our campaign website to add to your organization's website and social media channels to start the conversation. Request printed posters, cards and brochures from CDC to distribute at community events and to provide to local venues in your city by sending an e-mail request to ActAgainstAIDS@cdc.gov.
  • Joining the conversation on Facebook. Like the Start Talking. Stop HIV. Facebook page and share or respond to our posts. Also direct your followers to check out our materials.
    • Example Facebook post your organization can use: Check out CDC's new national HIV prevention campaign - Start Talking. Stop HIV. Start Talking to help Stop HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men. www.facebook.com/StartTalkingHIV
  • Chatting with us on Twitter. Spread the word about the campaign through Twitter by using the campaign hashtag #StartTalkingHIV and by following our account @TalkHIV.
    • Example tweet your organization can use: CDC's new #HIV campaign for gay & bisexual men promotes open communication about HIV prevention #StartTalkingHIV.
  • Talking to everyone you know about HIV. A conversation is just the first step toward stopping HIV in the gay community.
  • Incorporating Start Talking. Stop HIV. into community events and educational presentations, underscoring the importance of open communication about HIV risk and prevention strategies.

Thank you for your efforts to combat HIV and for your continued support of CDC and Act Against AIDS.



This article was provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Visit the CDC's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
Fact Sheet: HIV/AIDS and Young Men Who Have Sex With Men
Quiz: Are You at Risk for HIV?
10 Common Fears About HIV Transmission
More on HIV Prevention Campaigns & Programs for Gay Men

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