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News

California Porn Condom Bill Passes Committee

May 1, 2014

This article was reported by Los Angeles Daily News.

The Los Angeles Daily News reported that a committee of the California State Assembly voted in favor of Assembly Bill 1576, which would require porn actors to use condoms during film production and to have regular STD testing. The City of Los Angeles approved a similar law -- Measure B -- in 2012, and Assembly Member Isadore Hall (D-Compton) has tried twice unsuccessfully to expand the mandate statewide. The measure goes next to the Assembly Appropriations Committee, where it failed to pass last year. Some porn stars and public health advocates described the bill as a "basic workplace safety measure."

California Division of Occupational Safety and Health rules already prohibited shooting porn scenes without condoms. However, the state only launched investigations in response to complaints. The bill's supporters explained that state regulators have been slow to adopt standards requiring condom use in the adult film industry.

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Porn studio owners and some porn stars objected to the condom mandate. The studios stated that they required regular STD testing to prevent the need for condom use. The Free Speech Coalition claimed that the Los Angeles condom law resulted in the loss of adult film industry and related business in Los Angeles. Film LA, a nonprofit that issues film production licenses, reported that the number of licenses issued dropped from 480 in 2012 to 40 in 2013. Attorney Marc Randazza warned that the industry was moving to Nevada, which has low fees and little regulation.

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) believed the objections were a response to business safety regulations and stated that the number of licenses issued did not reflect a larger, unregulated segment of the adult film industry. AHF pledged to file complaints against film makers who moved their business to other states and asserted that shooting porn films was illegal in most states.

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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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