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Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and HIV in Women

February 2014

Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and HIV in Women

What We Know About IPV and HIV in Women


Mechanisms

Exposure to IPV can increase women's risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection through:

  • forced sex with an infected partner
  • limited or compromised negotiation of safer sex practices
  • increased sexual risk-taking behaviors

Source: Maman, S. et al. 2000. The intersections of HIV and violence: Directions for future research and interventions. Social Science & Medicine 50(4):459-478.


Links Between IPV and HIV

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The association between violence against women and risk for HIV infection has been the focus of a growing number of studies. Findings from these studies indicate:


Studies of HIV-Positive Women

Several studies have examined the relationship between violence and the timing of becoming infected with HIV or disclosing HIV status. These studies suggest that IPV can be both a risk factor for HIV, and a consequence of HIV.


Studies of Women With a History of Abuse

What Is CDC doing to Address These Problems?

CDC focuses on preventing intimate partner violence before it happens and preventing new HIV infections.

CDC focuses on preventing intimate partner violence before it happens and preventing new HIV infections.

CDC focuses on preventing intimate partner violence before it happens and preventing new HIV infections. CDC's work focuses on three areas: 1) understanding these problems, 2) identifying effective interventions, and 3) ensuring that states and communities have the capacity and resources to implement prevention approaches based on the best available evidence. Some examples of CDC's work are provided below.


Understand the Problem


Develop, Evaluate and Identify Effective Interventions


Implement and Disseminate Effective Strategies

You Know Him. But You Can't Know Everything. Get a Free HIV Test.

CDC also collaborates with other parts of the federal government that provide leadership and resources for service provision. More could be done to integrate violence prevention and HIV programming and response into health services, including family planning, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and infectious disease policies and programs which provide important entry points for identifying and responding to adolescents and women who experience violence or are at risk for HIV.

For more information about HIV and VAW, visit www.cdc.gov/hiv and www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention.

References

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