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Prevention/Epidemiology
"No Sex for Fish" Group Aims to Decrease HIV/AIDS Prevalence in Kenya

January 9, 2014

Two articles examine a campaign in Kenya's Lake Victoria region that aims to prevent the spread of HIV by ending some women's practice of trading sex for fish.

IIP Digital: 'No Sex for Fish' Group Helps Fight Spread of HIV/AIDS in Kenya
"In Kenya, Peace Corps volunteers have been working to end the practice of trading sex for fish, which has perpetuated the spread of HIV/AIDS among communities along Lake Victoria. ... Working with Kenyan businesses and U.S. federal government partners, the volunteers have acquired boats for women involved in the fish trade and supported the development of their own fishing business..." (1/8).

The Star: No sex for fish, Kisumu women vow
"Despite many campaigns to end the practice, sex-for-fish trade in Lake Victoria is still prevalent. However, women are now taking it upon themselves to end the practice which has led to the spread of HIV/AIDS in the region. A project dubbed No Sex For Fish aims to end the practice known as Jaboya in Dholuo..." (Gichana, 1/7).

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