Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

International News
Some HIV Patients in Africa Developing Drug Resistance, Study Shows

December 9, 2013

"New research suggests that some AIDS patients [in Africa] are developing drug intolerance and severe side effects and will now have to switch to new, more expensive antiretroviral regimens," Inter Press Service reports. "Researchers in Zimbabwe, Uganda, Nigeria and Malawi say some patients on the first-line antiretroviral drugs nevirapine and efavirenz (EFZ) are showing signs of being intolerant to the two drugs," the news service writes, noting they reported their findings at the 17th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa taking place in Cape Town, South Africa. "The challenge of paying for this expanded treatment coverage is complicated by the possibility that some patients will need different medication," IPS writes, adding, "Further research to determine both the causes and extent of drug intolerance is called for" (Banda, 12/9).

Back to other news for December 2013


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/73458/some-hiv-patients-in-africa-developing-drug-resist.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.